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EXPERIMENT INFORMATION

Microbial Analysis of International Space Station (ISS) Air, Surfaces and Water (ISS_Micro_Analysis)
Principal Investigator
Research Area:
Microbiology
Species Studied
Scientific Name: Bacterium Species: Bacterium

Description
OBJECTIVES:
NASA scientists have continuously performed routine environmental monitoring of the air, surfaces, and water systems of the International Space Station (ISS). Surface sample collection began in 2000 (Expedition 1), air sample collection began in 2001 (Expedition 2) and water monitoring of the U.S. potable water system has occurred since the installation of the potable water dispenser (PWD) in 2009 (Expedition 20). The specific objectives of the air, water, and surface sampling are:

1. To ensure that the air quality is microbiologically safe for crewmembers and to ensure compliance with existing acceptability limits established for microbial air sampling.

2. To ensure a microbiologically safe environment for crewmembers and to ensure compliance with existing acceptability limits established for microbial surface sampling.

3. To check for the presence of microbial contaminants in the potable water provided for crew use on the ISS and verify compliance with established water quality requirements.


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Publications
Castro VA, Thrasher AN, Healy M, Ott CM, Pierson DL. Microbial characterization during the early habitation of the International Space Station. Microb Ecol, 2004; 47(2):119-26. pubmed.gov

Pierson DL, Ott CM, et al. Microbial Monitoring of the International Space Station. In: Moldenhauer J, Ed. Environmental Monitoring: A Comprehensive Handbook. River Grove, IL: DHI Publishing; 2012:1-27.

Keywords
Bacteria
Bacteria/classification

Data Information
Data Availability
Archive is complete. All data sets are on the Web site.
Data Sets + View data.

Parameters
Bacterial isolates, air
Bacterial isolates, surfaces
Bacterial isolates, water
Colony forming units

Mission/Study Information
Mission Launch/Start Date Landing/End Date Duration
Expedition 13 03/22/2006 09/24/2006 186 days
Expedition 19 03/26/2009 10/11/2009 199 days
Expedition 20 05/27/2009 10/11/2009 137 days
Expedition 21 10/11/2009 12/01/2009 51 days
Expedition 22 11/30/2009 03/18/2010 109 days
Expedition 23 03/18/2010 06/01/2010 75 days
Expedition 24 06/01/2010 09/25/2010 117 days
Expedition 25 09/24/2010 11/25/2010 31 days
Expedition 26 11/26/2010 03/16/2011 111 days
Expedition 27 03/14/2011 05/23/2011 70 days
Expedition 28 05/23/2011 09/15/2011 115 days
Expedition 29 09/16/2011 11/21/2011 40 days
Expedition 30 11/14/2011 04/27/2012 166 days
Expedition 31 04/27/2012 07/01/2012 65 days
Expedition 32 07/01/2012 09/16/2012 78 days
Expedition 33 09/16/2012 11/18/2012 63 days
Expedition 34 11/18/2012 03/15/2013 117 days
Expedition 35 03/15/2013 05/13/2013 58 days
Expedition 36 05/13/2013 09/10/2013 166 days
Expedition 37 09/10/2013 11/10/2013 61 days
Expedition 38 11/10/2013 03/10/2014 120 days
Expedition 39 03/10/2014 05/13/2014 64 days
Expedition 40 05/13/2014 09/10/2014 133 days
Expedition 41 09/10/2014 11/09/2014 29 days
Expedition 42 11/10/2014 03/11/2015 121 days
Expedition 43 03/11/2015 06/10/2015 91 days
Expedition 45 09/11/2015 12/11/2015 91 days

Human Research Program (HRP) Human Research Roadmap (HRR) Information
Crew health and performance is critical to successful human exploration beyond low Earth orbit. The Human Research Program (HRP) investigates and mitigates the highest risks to human health and performance, providing essential countermeasures and technologies for human space exploration. Risks include physiological and performance effects from hazards such as radiation, altered gravity, and hostile environments, as well as unique challenges in medical support, human factors, and behavioral health support. The HRP utilizes an Integrated Research Plan (IRP) to identify the approach and research activities planned to address these risks, which are assigned to specific Elements within the program. The Human Research Roadmap is the web-based tool for communicating the IRP content.

The Human Research Roadmap is located at: https://humanresearchroadmap.nasa.gov/

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Additional Information
Managing NASA Center
Johnson Space Center (JSC)
Responsible NASA Representative
Johnson Space Center LSDA Office
Project Manager: Terry Hill
Institutional Support
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)